PRECIOUS LITTLE TALENT by ELLA HICKSON

A former journalist and ex-assistant editor of the Edinburgh Evening News is performing at this year’s Edinburgh Fringe Festival, after dramatically changing careers at the beginning of this year.  John McColl, who stars in Ella Hickson’s latest production ‘Precious Little Talent’, spent over 30 years working as a reporter and editor in the UK media before switching to the theatre in January.

Speaking of the decision, McColl says ‘I’ve always been interested in acting – there are a lot of actors in my family – but I hit a crossroads in my teens between journalism and acting, and I went for newspapers.  I had some good times as a journalist, but as I got older I started thinking if I don’t do it, I’ll always have a “what if” and I didn’t want any regrets.’

He is very excited about the Fringe and the possibilities for ‘Precious Little Talent’ saying, ‘it’s brilliant, I’m getting paid for what I love to do’.  He has previously performed in amateur productions at the Fringe, and this year is also appearing in ‘A Promised Land’ at the Scottish Storytelling Centre.

So far, McColl has appeared in ‘Lapse’ a 2009 film by BG Productions screened at The Filmhouse, and two plays; Saint Joan at the 2008 Edinburgh Fringe, and ‘To The Cross’, both performed at the Theatre Alba. He has also written four plays, including ‘Sandcastles on the Beach’ (published by Samuel French and performed in UK, and other countries including China, Australia and Germany), and ‘The Hunchback of St Giles’ (now at the Scottish Storytelling Centre).

In ‘Precious Little Talent’, which opens next week, John plays George, a 65-year-old English man living in New York.  A cuttingly intelligent ex-professor of linguistics, George is a man living with a secret that he tries desperately to keep hidden from his daughter, Joey, when she unexpectedly joins him for Christmas.

Pitching American optimism against British cynicism and asking which holds up when times get tough, ‘Precious Little Talent’ is a warm, funny and beautifully written story of memory and family, of daughters and lovers, of aspiration and frustration, told by a generation fighting not to be forgotten.

PRECIOUS LITTLE TALENT by ELLA HICKSON
BEDLAM THEATRE, VENUE 49, 6TH – 29TH AUGUST

For more information or to book tickets for ‘Precious Little Talent’ at the Fringe.

www.preciouslittletalent.com

Ella Hickson’s ‘Eight’ at Trafalgar Studios Now on Sale!

Ella Hickson’s ‘Eight’ swept the board at the Edinburgh Festival in 2008. An underground hit, propagated by sensational word-of-mouth, it went on to garner excellent reviews and win the three top awards at the world’s largest arts festival.

This thumpingly British show went stateside in January 2009 where it achieved huge critical acclaim and a sell-out run in New York’s PS122 Theatre.

This summer, ‘Eight’ is coming home.

Hickson’s eight endearing characters offer deliciously cynical yet touching snippets of life in contemporary Britain, questioning what it is to be ‘normal’ in a generation where everything has become acceptable. From 7/7 survivors (“One of the finest pieces of writing I’ve yet heard about the aftermath of that terrible day” Joyce McMillan, The Scotsman) to ex-squaddies making friends in morgues, ‘Eight’ looks at Britain’s youth from a refreshingly offbeat angle.

Written and directed by 23 year old Londoner, Ella Hickson,‘Eight’ is a precocious and impressive debut show; Hickson is the youngest ever playwright to be published by Nick Hern, the UK’s leading performing arts publisher, “I’m trying to tackle the negative reputation my generation have earned themselves. We do have something intelligent to offer and we’re not afraid of asking tough questions.”

The format of the show lets the audience “choose their company” and vote to determine which four of the eight monologues are performed each night, creating their own bespoke hour of theatre. Formed around the results of a survey that asked twenty-somethings what defined their generation, Hickson has tried to answer their almost unanimous response of ‘apathy’, with a show that works to find the glimmers of faith amidst wholesale cynicism. ‘Eight’ moves seamlessly from morbidity to hilarity as its characters search for meaning in a morally, spiritually and literally bankrupt Britain.

“Hickson has already found her voice and it’s a powerful one – a potent show indeed” New York Times

“Stunningly well performed – a huge writing talent…a truly impressive and exciting hour of theatre, you’re blown away.” The Scotsman

“One of the most self-assured, startlingly well-written and moving pieces of theatre around.” The Herald

“Intriguing writing, brilliant direction and excellent performances.” British Theatre Guide

For More Informtion: www.eight-theatre.com

Ella Hickson’s ‘Eight’ at Trafalgar Studios

Ella Hickson’s ‘Eight’ swept the board at the Edinburgh Festival in 2008. An underground hit, propagated by sensational word-of-mouth, it went on to garner excellent reviews and win the three top awards at the world’s largest arts festival.

This thumpingly British show went stateside in January 2009 where it achieved huge critical acclaim and a sell-out run in New York’s PS122 Theatre. This summer, ‘Eight’ is coming home.

Hickson’s eight endearing characters offer deliciously cynical yet touching snippets of life in contemporary Britain, questioning what it is to be ‘normal’ in a generation where everything has become acceptable. From 7/7 survivors (“One of the finest pieces of writing I’ve yet heard about the aftermath of that terrible day” Joyce McMillan, The Scotsman) to ex-squaddies making friends in morgues, ‘Eight’ looks at Britain’s youth from a refreshingly offbeat angle.

Written and directed by 23 year old Londoner, Ella Hickson,‘Eight’ is a precocious and impressive debut show; Hickson is the youngest ever playwright to be published by Nick Hern, the UK’s leading performing arts publisher, “I’m trying to tackle the negative reputation my generation have earned themselves. We do have something intelligent to offer and we’re not afraid of asking tough questions.”

The format of the show lets the audience “choose their company” and vote to determine which four of the eight monologues are performed each night, creating their own bespoke hour of theatre. Formed around the results of a survey that asked twenty-somethings what defined their generation, Hickson has tried to answer their almost unanimous response of ‘apathy’, with a show that works to find the glimmers of faith amidst wholesale cynicism. ‘Eight’ moves seamlessly from morbidity to hilarity as its characters search for meaning in a morally, spiritually and literally bankrupt Britain. 

Press Night: July 8th, 7pm, Trafalgar Studios.  Contact Michael Whitham.