Mrs Warren’s Profession at Comedy Theatre Reviews!

What is Mrs Warren’s profession? Her daughter Vivie has never really known much about her mother. A prim young woman, she has enjoyed a comfortable upbringing, a Cambridge education and a generous monthly allowance. Now she has ambitions to go into Law. Is it conceivablethat all this privilege and respectability has been financed from the proceeds of the oldest profession? How will Vivie react when she finds out the awful truth about her mother’s ill-gotten gains?

Shaw’s ultimate test of a mother-daughter relationship is one of his most witty and provocative plays. Written in 1894 but banned from performance until the racy 1920s, Mrs Warren’s Profession lays bare the rampant hypocrisy of Victorian society and its constrained morals

Mrs Warren’s Profession Press Reviews:

There is something bird-like in her trim physique, sheathed in glistening satins of scarlet, silver and dove grey, gathered to a 12-inch waist and topped in the last act with a Martita Hunt-style pill-box hat.
Michael Coveney for Whatsonstage.com (www.whatsonstage.com)
[Rating:2.0/5]

“If you want to pick and choose your acquaintance on moral grounds,” he tells Vivie, whom he absurdly wants to marry, “you’d better clear out of the country”. The play has its implausible, melodramatic and preachy moments, yet Rudman’s revival has the energy to keep you engrossed. That, in spite of a questionable performance or two. Should Yelland really be so much the sauntering Chekhovian roué in the white suit, so little the coarse brute Shaw wanted? And couldn’t Kendal be a bit more the woman others see as “brazen”, she herself calls a “vulgarian”, and a stage direction asks to lapse into her old Cockney self?
Benedict Nightingale for Times Online (www.timesonline.co.uk)
[Rating:3.0/5]

“If you want to pick and choose your acquaintance on moral grounds,” he tells Vivie, whom he absurdly wants to marry, “you’d better clear out of the country”. The play has its implausible, melodramatic and preachy moments, yet Rudman’s revival has the energy to keep you engrossed. That, in spite of a questionable performance or two. Should Yelland really be so much the sauntering Chekhovian roué in the white suit, so little the coarse brute Shaw wanted? And couldn’t Kendal be a bit more the woman others see as “brazen”, she herself calls a “vulgarian”, and a stage direction asks to lapse into her old Cockney self?
Henry Hitchings for Evening Standard (www.thisislondon.co.uk)
[Rating:3.0/5]

Michael Rudman’s production, with a determinedly unappealing Felicity Kendal at its centre, goes some way to put flesh on Shaw’s arguments. Kendal’s Kitty Warren, the rich brothel-keeper, and Lucy Briggs-Owen as Vivie, her clever mathematician daughter, make good sparring partners.
Heather Neill for TheStage (www.thestage.co.uk)

Much as I normally enjoy Miss Kendal’s art, I’m afraid she doesn’t show us enough of Mr s Warren’s undoubted steel, or amorality, or devilishness, or sexual hunger, or whatever it is. I didn’t feel she had quite worked out what made the character tick.
Quentin Letts for The Daily Mail (www.dailymail.co.uk)
[Rating:2.0/5]

For more information about show and tickets, click here!

Leave a Reply